There are no active ads.

How to Check Your Mac’s Specifications

by Justin Herrick | November 23, 2018November 23, 2018 11:30 am PST

The Mac might be simple on the outside, but inside there’s a complex array of hardware and software components working together. Apple, though, makes it incredibly simple to understand your computer.

Just as macOS couldn’t be any easier to navigate, you’re also able to dive into the nitty-gritty of a Mac and discover its specifications.

Why would you want to know the internals? Frankly, everyone should be aware of the basics. It goes a long way in the event you ask Apple Support or even Reddit for some help. Just remember what Mac model you have, its software version, and the processor.

Let’s see what’s happening under the hood.

How to check your Mac’s specifications

How to Check Your Mac's Specifications - About This Mac

From anywhere on your Mac, click the Apple icon in the menu bar

Select ‘About This Mac’ in the drop-down menu

How to Check Your Mac's Specifications - System Report

Take a glance at the overview, and use the tabs at the top of the window for snippets on important areas of the computer

Each tab will focus on a different area — Displays, Storage, Memory, Support, Service

If you’d like more information on all specifications, select ‘System report…’

How to Check Your Mac's Specifications - Hardware Overview

Along the left side, you’ll see tabs for Hardware, Network, and Software

These tabs break down into a number of subcategories

Select the tab and subcategory of interest to see its details in the main area; pretty much every component inside your Mac is mentioned

We weren’t kidding in saying your Mac’s specifications are easy to understand. The System Report doesn’t hide anything on these laptops and desktops.

Apple offers up information on graphics, storage, ports, Wi-Fi, and more. In total, there are four dozen subcategories to explore. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, it probably doesn’t exist. Everything within that aluminum frame is laid out in one spot and Apple certainly didn’t go light on details.


Justin Herrick

Justin is easily attracted to power buttons. His interest in technology started as a child in the 1990s with the original PlayStation, and two...

Advertisement

Advertisement