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Google’s New Chromebook Ad Slams macOS, Windows

by Justin Herrick | August 1, 2018August 1, 2018 7:30 am PDT

Google doesn’t want to hear anyone knocking Chrome OS for being unreliable these days. In a new 60-second advertisement, we see where a Chromebook might be better than its alternatives.

The ad, which should begin playing online and on television in the U.S. soon, takes direct shots at Apple’s macOS and Microsoft’s Windows. Neither system is named, but Google recreated their user interfaces to showcase a few pitfalls. Chrome OS, meanwhile, gets pushed as a fast, secure, and robust choice for all consumers.

Watch the ad here, and then we’ll discuss it:

From the start, Google throws shade at Apple and Microsoft for long loading times. Those classic hourglass and pinwheel icons are nonexistent on Chrome OS. While macOS and Windows need a good amount of internal horsepower, Google’s operating system leans on the cloud.

Its competitors also earned themselves some criticism for lacking in stability and security. Have you ever seen a system error on Windows? Of course, but Chrome OS tends to stay smooth. What about a barrage of time-consuming software updates on macOS? Google silently manages Chrome OS for you. You keep doing what you want in the process.

Once the shots have been fired, the ad pivots to highlight a Chromebook’s advantages. The Pixelbook makes an appearance to run various apps and games.

Google gives apps like Spotify, Netflix, Photoshop, and Evernote an opportunity to shine. Over the years, Google’s made a strong effort for Android apps to live on Chrome OS. With more of these devices featuring touch-enabled displays, this type of cross-platform access is a huge plus for users.

The whole reason for the ad is to make a Chromebook look great for productivity and entertainment, and we’d say it succeeds. Google has a practical solution for many needs. Now it’s up to consumers to decide if they want to ditch their Mac or PC for the cloud-based life.


Justin Herrick

Justin is easily attracted to power buttons. His interest in technology started as a child in the 1990s with the original PlayStation, and two...

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