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Mozilla’s new Firefox extension helps users quarantine their Facebook visits

by Eric Frederiksen | March 29, 2018March 29, 2018 11:00 am PST

People are having a hard time trusting Facebook right now. And for good reason. We’ve been giving them piles and piles of information for years, and now it seems like its not being very responsible with that information, despite claims to the contrary. The company is rolling out new privacy features and delaying hardware in hopes of regaining trust. But we can’t help but be nervous. Mozilla, the company behind the popular Firefox web browser, has one answer to the problem that hopes to ease our fears without us having to #deletefacebook.

Mozilla has launched a Facebook Container add-on for Firefox that it says will make it “much harder” for Facebook to track you when you’re not actually on Facebook.

Once you install the add-on, you can browse Facebook in a separate instance of Firefox that allows you to stay signed in but walls it off from the rest of your browsing experience. A walled garden for your walled garden. Any non-Facebook links you click in the container will open in a normal Firefox browser window, while links to Facebook pages will stay within. You’ll be able to tell easily if you’re in the container thanks to the blue outline on the tab and the icon in the address bar:

Mozilla says it’s important to know that the extension doesn’t take away any of the data Facebook already has. It’s up to you to set your privacy settings and not give it any additional information.  Removing app access and adjusting your privacy settings.

Data is money. Whether it’s Amazon, Google, Facebook, or whoever else, your data is their goldmine. We should be able to easily control how much data we give these organizations, and to know when we’re giving them data. This container makes the latter case a lot easier to work with.

If you already use Firefox, you can download the extension right now.


Eric Frederiksen

Eric Frederiksen has been a gamer since someone made the mistake of letting him play their Nintendo many years ago, pushing him to beg for his own,...

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