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New iPhone model should be cheaper than current iPhone X

by Justin Herrick | March 21, 2018March 21, 2018 11:00 am PDT

The next iPhone you buy might not be so expensive. Apple brought the iPhone X to the market with a high price tag because making the product wasn’t cheap, but there’s a new report saying one vendor lowered its cost of assembly and can pass that on to the company. It would allow at least one of the new iPhone models released in 2018 to be less expensive but still ship with high-end components, so consumers could avoid paying nearly $1,000 for a cutting-edge iPhone.

According to DigiTimes, it’s the 5.8-inch model benefitting from the reduced costs. The product’s “manufacturing bill of materials” is 10% lower than the iPhone X, which is said to come in at $400 as of last year.

Apple is expected to be developing three new iPhone models. The larger sizes have 6.1- and 6.5-inch displays, but the company wants to keep a compact one similar to the iPhone X available. It’ll have a 5.8-inch OLED display just like the current flagship. The original plan was to use an LCD display as a method to bring down costs, but the supply chain is pulling through in Apple’s direction.

While the 6.5-inch model will also have an OLED display, it’s likely the 6.1-inch model sticks with an LCD display similar to the iPhone 8. Apple can’t pick up enough units to supply the entire 2018 lineup with custom OLED panels.

Other areas that could be different across the three models are processor, memory, and storage. We’ll have a better idea on what’s going on there as the year progresses, though.

This report is certainly a good sign for consumers. Although the iPhone X has sold very well around the world, many of Apple’s longtime customers have avoided the most advanced iPhone ever made because of its price. They’re waiting for the day when a new iPhone with all the bells and whistles doesn’t cost a fortune returns.

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Justin Herrick

Justin is easily attracted to power buttons. His interest in technology started as a child in the 1990s with the original PlayStation, and two...


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