Advertisement

Android Pay, Google Wallet transition to Google Pay today

by Justin Herrick | February 20, 2018February 20, 2018 8:00 am PDT

When the calendar changed to 2018, Google surprised us with a big shakeup for Android Pay and Google Wallet. Both of the popular money-handling services would be merged into Google Pay. It’s certainly welcome since Google had different capabilities spread across different apps, which doesn’t help anyone. Here we are a little more than a month later, and the transition is finally happening for users everywhere.

The company announced that its new all-in-one mobile payments service is rolling out today.

 

Bringing together Android Pay and Google Wallet should allow you to have a central hub for purchases, passes, and payment methods. That’s at least what Google hopes it will accomplish. Like Android Pay, Google Pay stores your cards and memberships for seamless in-person or online transactions. And, as Google Wallet did, you can send and receive money in just a few taps.

On the Google Pay app itself, you see a rundown of cards and memberships, a history of transactions, nearby stores, and helpful tips.

Google Pay works wherever you see contactless payments are accepted. It’s usually identified by a hand holding a card with some signals firing in one direction. Hold your NFC-enabled phone toward the terminal, and your payment info is sent encrypted and securely to complete the transaction.

If you’re shopping on a website or app, you’ll also find Google Pay available. Since it’s linked to your Google Account, the same payment methods on your phone will be available elsewhere. Just choose how you’re going to pay, and Google Pay will complete the transaction online.

While the Android Pay app is being overhauled to represent Google Pay moving forward, the Google Wallet app is being renamed Google Pay Send. Businesses, meanwhile, can easily switch to Google Pay to let their customers know Google’s latest mobile payments service is welcome.

Google

Justin Herrick

Justin is easily attracted to power buttons. His interest in technology started as a child in the 1990s with the original PlayStation, and two...

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement