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Ubisoft hopes Assassin’s Creed Origins might teach you something

by Eric Frederiksen | February 15, 2018February 15, 2018 9:00 am PST

One of my favorite parts of the Assassin’s Creed games has long been the ability to visit a faithfully-researched reproduction of an ancient place. Whether it’s renaissance-era Italy, France or the American colonies in the midst of revolution, there’s always a feast for the eyes and tons of history to uncover. Now, Ubisoft is making that a real part of the latest game in the series, Assassin’s Creed Origins, with a new Discovery Tour mode set to release next week as a free update to owners of the game, and as a $20 standalone title for those who want the history without the stabbing.

Discovery Tour brings the entire world of Assassin’s Creed Origins, with the free-roaming intact, but adds in 75 guided tours that Ubisoft says were curated by experts. Tours include the pyramids, the city of Alexandria, daily life in ancient Egypt, and more, with tours ranging from 5 to 25 minutes in length.

You’re not stuck walking around at a snail’s pace, either. You can hop on a camel, into a boat, climb anything you’d be able to climb in he main game, and get a bird’s eye view with Bayek’s eagle, Senu. You just don’t have to worry about guards getting mad when you wander into the wrong spots. It turns the game into a giant historical exhibit.

This is really cool. Imagine going into class and seeing Assassin’s Creed setup on the main screen, or being able to cite it in a report for class. This has the potential to be a great teaching tool that brings together one of the biggest game franchises with some real, valuable, historical content.

The update goes live on February 20 on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.

Now if Ubisoft would go back and add this to games like Unity, Syndicate, and Assassin’s Creed II‘s remake, we’d really have something.


Eric Frederiksen

Eric Frederiksen has been a gamer since someone made the mistake of letting him play their Nintendo many years ago, pushing him to beg for his own,...

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