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Nest co-founder Matt Rogers exits Google

by Justin Herrick | February 9, 2018February 9, 2018 3:00 pm PST

Nest co-founder Matt Rogers isn’t sticking around for Google’s big bet on hardware. As the company announced Nest would be rolled into its fast-growing hardware division, Rogers announced his departure. The man who started the home automation brand eight years will go full-time at Incite, a firm in San Francisco seeking to invest in world-changing startups.

Until this week, Nest operated independently despite Alphabet acquiring it for $3 billion in 2014. Nest continued developing connected devices for the home while Google did its own thing working on the Google Home family.

The other Nest co-founder, Tony Fadell, also left but in 2016. Both started Nest in 2010 following years spent at Apple. With Google overseeing Nest, it’s likely both felt comfortable moving on to new projects.

Google’s hardware division, which Nest’s employees are now part of, is headed by Rick Osterloh. He’s the former Motorola executive who was brought to Mountain View as Google plans on going all-in on hardware just as much as software.

Below is the full statement Rogers gave to CNET:

“After almost nine incredible, intense years working to build Nest, I’ve decided to begin my transition to dedicate more of my time to Incite.org, as well as to start thinking about the next adventure. In the coming months, I’ll be working closely with Google’s Hardware leads to define the 2019 roadmap and to ensure a smooth integration of Nest into Google’s Hardware group.

Nest has been an amazing journey and the honor of my career to build. Together with the Nest team and our partners, we’ve helped save over 19 billion kWh of energy, helped save a number of lives — both human and pets — with Nest Protect, and helped families feel more safe at home with Nest Secure and Nest Cam. And along the way, we managed to build the leading brand in the connected home space. I could not be more proud of what we have accomplished and can’t wait to see what’s next for Nest.”

CNET

Justin Herrick

Justin is easily attracted to power buttons. His interest in technology started as a child in the 1990s with the original PlayStation, and two...

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