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Experience the joy of classic JRPGs with Lost Sphear, the latest from Square Enix

by Ron Duwell | February 4, 2018February 4, 2018 12:00 pm PST

Square Enix doesn’t have to try that hard to reignite passion in the classic JRPG genre. The company could put something like Chrono Trigger or the classic Final Fantasy games on modern console and fans would flock to them like seagulls, even twenty years after their original release.

There’s really nothing else quite like it in video gaming, and if today’s video games inspire the same reaction twenty years from now, I would be very surprised. Still, Square Enix can’t entirely rely on games that are older than a large chunk of its audience. That’s why it created Tokyo RPG Factory, an upstart studio responsible for creating JRPGs inspired by the days of the classic and cranking out the wonderful I Am Setsuna back in 2016. The studio returned to the spotlight recently with its sophomore video game, Lost Sphear, coming to the Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, and PC.

The description sounds about as old-school as an entry in the genre can get.

A young man, who suffered a phenomenon that he had never seen, faces an ominous power that threatens the fabric of reality. Awaken the power of Memory to restore what was lost! Muster different Memory and craft the world around you in a journey to save the world.

Young hero, evil power, memories, saving the world. Sign me up! The only thing missing are giant yellow chickens, but I suppose this is the wrong franchise for that.

Reception is what you would expect, hovering at about the same aggregate scores as I Am Setsuna, and it is being enjoyed by those who it was clearly intended for. Should I get the chance, I’ll fire it up and see how it compares. If you’re a holdover from the Super Nintendo and PlayStation days of the genre though, you probably don’t need my word to convince you.

Check out Lost Sphear on the PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, and PC through Steam.


Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...

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