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Be happy you can’t buy the LG Signature Edition

by Justin Herrick | December 7, 2017December 7, 2017 10:00 am PST

LG announced a phone that costs a whopping $1,800. Fortunately you won’t be able to buy it unless you live in South Korea. The Signature Edition also doesn’t have anything you can’t already get. It’s nothing more than a fancier V30, which the company only released a few months ago.

The design is nearly identical to LG’s current flagship. It looks just like the V30, but the company did swap out the exterior’s glass for “zirconium ceramic.” Apparently that’s a material capable of resisting scratches normally collected by other phones over time. Still the Signature Edition just doesn’t look new. There’s no avoiding its recycled appearance. And the internal specifications don’t get better, either.

Somehow, though, you should be paying more than the iPhone X’s price for this phone.

LG didn’t make too many changes from the V30 and V30+, but the company still feels it did enough to justify the massive jump in price. The phone features a 6-inch Quad HD+ (2880×1440) display with 18:9 aspect ratio, Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835, 6GB of RAM, 256GB of internal storage, a microSD card slot, 16MP and 13MP rear cameras, a 5MP front camera, a 3300mAh battery, and Android 8.0 Oreo.

So it really comes down to the ceramic build and latest version of Android separating the Signature Edition from its two siblings.

If you’re able to make the trip to South Korea and strangely want to purchase one, you can get your name engraved on the back of the phone. Oh, and LG plans to sell a very limited number of units. Only three hundred people will be able to get their hands on a Signature Edition. But really, you should look at the V30 or another phone instead. Don’t go crazy trying to important a Signature Edition because you want to feel like you’ve got something special.

Save your money and buy the iPhone X, Pixel 2, V30, Galaxy Note 8, or OnePlus 5.

LG

Justin Herrick

Justin is easily attracted to power buttons. His interest in technology started as a child in the 1990s with the original PlayStation, and two...

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