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Google Assistant can now talk right into your ears

by Justin Herrick | September 21, 2017September 21, 2017 7:00 am PDT

A joint announcement from Google and Bose reveals that Google Assistant is making its way to headphones around the world. The digital assistant will debut on the QC 35 II headphones first, and later this year and in early 2018 we’ll see additional companies release Google Assistant-ready personal audio products. It’s part of Google’s push to get artificial intelligence into as a many types of devices as possible.

The QC 35 II headphones are just like the QC 35 headphones. For the new version, Bose simply added a dedicated button for Google Assistant. It launches the digital assistant to listen for voice commands and respond with accurate information. Google Assistant can deliver messages, reminders, news, music, and more right into your ears without anyone else hearing.

The QC 35 II headphones, as well as all future headphones with Google Assistant, play nice with both Android and iOS devices.

A Bluetooth connection between your phone and the headphones keeps the digital assistant prepared for action. The actual headphones don’t do much. Most of the heavy lifting comes from your phone because that’s what has a capable processor and direct access to a wireless network.

You won’t need a special app to pair a phone and the QC 35 II headphones (or any other Google Assistant-ready headphones). Just use Google Assistant on your phone and the setup instructions are waiting. Bose is also revamping its Connect app for additional noise-canceling settings.

Priced at $349, the Bose QC 35 II headphones are available today. They’re being released in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Australia. Neither Google nor Bose, however, shared which retailers will offer them. It’s just known that the QC 35 II headphones are a pricey way to have Google Assistant talk into your ears.

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Justin Herrick

Justin is easily attracted to power buttons. His interest in technology started as a child in the 1990s with the original PlayStation, and two...


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