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Destiny 2 will be “more accessible to a casual player,” but veterans can still enjoy it

by Ron Duwell | February 13, 2017February 13, 2017 9:30 am PDT

Destiny 2 will hopefully be the return to Bungie’s science fiction universe that fans are hoping for. However, publisher Activision is looking to pick up an entirely new audience with the highly anticipated sequel coming out this fall.

As usual, this comes with two conflicting ideas: opening up the doors for new and lapsed players while still appealing to the veteran players. Many have used these exact same words when pitching their game and many have not been successful in living up to such lofty promises. However, that isn’t stopping Activision executive Eric Hirshberg from telling the company’s investors that everyone is going to be happy with Destiny 2.

The cornerstone of that is a great cinematic story. That’s been a real focus with a great cast of memorable, relatable characters, coupled with some very nice ways to make the game more accessible to a casual player, without losing anything that our core players love.

We’ve made it more accessible to someone who just wants to have a great more casual first-person action experience.

Where two worlds collide, that’s where Destiny 2 will be

I’m trying to think of any game that successfully appealed to both longtime and new coming fans of a franchise. Final Fantasy XV seems to be loved by both, but it’s equally despised by both, as well. There are still plenty of veterans who thought it was too much a departure from the originals. Likewise, younger fans think it’s a broken, silly game.

Neither group isn’t exactly wrong.

Destiny 2 can make an attempt to improve its storytelling, which it is certainly capable of doing as seen in the expansions, and that should be enough to hold over the older crowds. Newcomers just need an intro cinematic or optional codex entries to help get themselves caught up and then expand into the galaxy.

Eurogamer

Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...

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