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Nintendo Switch will support up to 2TB SDXC memory cards

by Ron Duwell | January 16, 2017January 16, 2017 8:00 am PST

When Nintendo revealed the specs of the Nintendo Switch over the weekend, one of the more worrisome problems with the console was the internal storage size. Natively, the Switch supports only 32GB of space, and fans found that roughly half of that space will be taken up by The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (if they go digital).

Nintendo’s flagship launch title weighs a hefty 13.4GB.

In response to these concerns, Nintendo issued a statement to Game Informer saying that the Nintendo Switch will be able to support external memory cards of up to 2TB. The company is looking ahead with the Switch as 1 TB and 2TB cards are not even available yet to everyday consumers.

Nintendo Switch is compatible with the SDXC standard, which supports up to 2TB. (Note that 2TB cards are not yet on the market, but the system will support them when they are.)

Sounds like the PlayStation Vita memory card issue

I’m getting flashbacks to the first day I bought my PlayStation Vita and didn’t realize that its memory cards were going to cost roughly half the price of the handheld. Granted, Nintendo is using SDXC standard memory cards, which is an improvement over the Vita’s dedicated cards, and their prices will decline as better models come out.

As for the launch, a 512GB is the largest SDXC memory card, and it will set potential buyers back $200. A standard Micro 256GB memory card will clearly be the option many gamers opt to take.

Of course, this all makes sense in the context of the Nintendo Switch. The console can’t have a huge dedicated hard drive, or else it wouldn’t be portable. 256GB will be enough to get yourself off the ground, and I doubt Nintendo’s games will be larger than AAA standards. Most of your favorites will fit, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the fridge needed a little cleaning after a year or so.


Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...

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