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PlayStation Now adds 15 JRPG “classics” to its service

by Ron Duwell | August 3, 2016August 3, 2016 2:30 pm PST

If ever there was a way for Sony to tempt me into a PlayStation Now subscription, the company just found it. 15 JRPG “classics” from the previous generation and a few indie hits have been added to its services.

However, my use of the word “classic” is a pretty liberal one at best and downright wrong at worst when it comes to these games. Let’s dive in, shall we?

  • Child of Light (Ubisoft)
  • Eternal Sonata (Bandai Namco)
  • The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel (Xseed Games)
  • Disgaea 4: A Promise Unforgotten (Nippon Ichi Software)
  • Legasista (Nippon Ichi Software)
  • The Awakened Fate Ultimatum (Nippon Ichi Software)
  • Wizardry: Labyrinth of Lost Souls (Xseed Games)
  • Faery: Legends of Avalon (Focus Home Interactive)
  • Rise of the Argonauts (Codemasters)
  • Mars: War Logs (Focus Home Interactive)
  • Battle Princess of Arcadias (Nippon Ichi Software)
  • Disgaea 3: Absence of Justice (Nippon Ichi Software)
  • Disgaea D2: A Brighter Darkness (Nippon Ichi Software)
  • The Guided Fate Paradox (Nippon Ichi Software)
  • Dragon Fin Soup (Grimm Bros)

What’s worth it here? All three Disagaea offerings are a blast since Disgaea is fun no matter how you cut it. Another game I have fleeting respect for is Eternal Sonata, which I love for the story and graphics but not the gameplay. If I were to go back and give any one of these a second chance, this would be it.

The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel is a popular choice, too, but it’s from a series that hasn’t yet struck a chord with me like most other JRPG fans. And then there are NipponIchi “non-Disgaea” games that have always interested me like The Guided Fate Paradox.

Not a horrible selection, but when looking for the best JRPGs the world has to offer, the previous generation is not the place to look. Take ’em as they are.


Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...

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