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Check out these crazy VR-ready PC backpacks

The first generation of high-end virtual reality gadgets has arrived, but the VR experience is still far from perfect. One of our biggest issues is the lack of mobility that comes with strapping on a computer-powered headset. A new generation of backpack-shaped PCs may offer a clever solution for using your Oculus Rift or HTC Vive on the go.

HP recently revealed a few flashy renders of its first backpack PC. Taiwanese company MSI quickly followed suit with a physical model unveiled at the Computex expo, which you can see in the images above from Lowyat. Finally, Chinese computer-maker Zotac actually built a special backpack that holds and powers one of its small Zbox PCs.

Based on what’s we’ve seen so far, HP’s model sports the nicest design. It’s slim and polished with a cool red and black color scheme. The built-in battery only lasts an hour, according to The Verge, but you can swap it out without shutting down the PC thanks to a smaller backup power source. HP’s computer also comes with a wireless keyboard, mouse and display so you can use it for non-VR purposes too. However, the company hasn’t revealed any official launch plans and says the design still needs some iteration.

MSI’s PC looks more like a traditional backpack and also functions a bit more like a regular computer. It comes packed with ports for plugging in a monitor, headphones, a keyboard and mouse, along with a special power jack for connecting the HTC Vive’s breakout box. We still don’t know when it will launch, but this PC backpack looks ready to go.

Finally, Zotac took a slightly different route, stuffing a regular PC into a specially designed backpack case. The company actually released a demo last month showing the technology in action and it looks pretty sweet. We’re expecting more information this week at Computex, but for now check out the video below.


Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...

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