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Verizon Galaxy S7 update snuck in DT Ignite bloatware app

by Todd Haselton | May 9, 2016May 9, 2016 12:00 pm PST

Verizon’s new Galaxy S7/Galaxy S7 Edge update, which just started rolling out last week, includes a service named “DT Ignite.” It’s a service that we’ve seen before, but one you probably wish wasn’t included in the patch.

If DT Ignite sounds familiar, that’s because it first made a lot of headlines a few years back when Droid Life noticed it on the Galaxy Note 4. Basically, it tells the phone to install a set of applications that Verizon wants on your Android phone when you set it up. That’s when you get those preloaded bloatware applications that you’re probably already familiar with. Believe it or not, most of Verizon’s Android phones already ship with it installed; the Verizon Galaxy S7, however, didn’t.

“Customers who already have an S7 will not find new or random apps installed or pushed to their phone after the software update,” a Verizon spokesperson explained to TechnoBuffalo in a statement. “The Digital Turbine (DT Ignite) software is only active during the initial set-up of a brand new device or if a device goes through a factory reset. Following the initial set up, the software will not push or install new apps at any time in the background. Any app installed through DT Ignite is completely removable and can be uninstalled.”

You can stop the service (and you probably should by visiting your Application Settings menu), but it’s really just more of an annoying problem that continues to exist with Android phones sold by U.S. carriers. HTC, to its credit, is trying to fight this sort of stuff off with a stick, which might be one reason why it’s not selling the HTC 10 on AT&T.  And to Apple’s credit, somehow the iPhone has avoided this plague from carriers all along.

A Samsung representative was not immediately available for comment.

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Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...

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