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Microsoft Translator app now supports images on Android

by Killian Bell | April 24, 2016April 24, 2016 2:00 pm PST

Microsoft-Translator-image-translation

Microsoft’s Translator app for Android now has the ability to translate text within images. Its latest update also adds additional downloadable language packs, and an inline translator that makes understanding foreign text in other apps even easier.

With the ability to translate text within images, Translator no longer requires you to enter words and phrases manually. You can take a picture of signs, menus, leaflets, emails, and more — and Translator will find the text within them, then translate it into your native tongue.

What’s more, Translator supports real-time image translation, which means you don’t have to snap a picture first and then translate it; simply point your camera at the subject and it will work its magic instantly. iOS users have been enjoying the same feature since February.

This update also adds 34 languages to the list of downloadable language packs, which means there’s now a total of 43. According to Microsoft, these language packs provide the best offline translation available today.

“The downloadable language packs use Deep Neural Networks, also known as Deep Learning, a state-of-the-art machine learning technology that are able to deliver online-quality translations without an internet connection,” Microsoft explains.

“This Deep Neural Network technology provides the highest-quality offline translation available on the market.”

Finally, this update also adds super useful inline translation that works across Android. So when you stumble across foreign text inside other apps — such as in emails or on Twitter — you can simply highlight it, select “Other Options,” and then choose Translator.

You can download the latest Microsoft Translator update from Google Play now. If you don’t have the app installed already, you’ll find it by following the source link below.


Killian Bell

Killian Bell is a 20-something technology journalist based in a tiny town in England. He has an obsession with that little company in Cupertino...

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