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Super-secretive Magic Leap releases first video of stunning AR tech

by Jacob Kleinman | April 19, 2016April 19, 2016 10:36 am PDT

The Oculus Rift and HTC Vive are already here. Even Microsoft is offering developer kit versions of its HoloLens, but Magic Leap‘s technology remains a mystery.

The Google-backed company has been working on a mixed reality headset for years, and on Tuesday it released an impressive new video showing what the technology can do. Additionally, Wired has a long feature on the mysterious firm that fills in some of the details and, more importantly, confirms that the technology really works.

The video above offers a glimpse into how your morning routine could change thanks to Magic Leap. Instead of a computer or a mobile device, the headset projects virtual displays and images all around you. That makes it possible to view multiple apps at once while a list of incoming notifications hovers on the side.

Shopping online with Magic Leap could entail looking at detailed holograms of the product you’re interested in buying. You can also create 3D graphs and charts, but the most impressive feature is saved for last.

Once all the work is done and the screens melt away into nothing, we see a pack of virtual pink jellyfish swim across the ceiling like a screen saver for the world. It’s a mesmerizing image and a reminder of the beauty that’s possible with this kind of technology.

Wired‘s report also details a few other applications. There’s a realistic droid companion and a mixed-reality game where you use a physical prop gun to fend off attacking human-sized robots as they come crashing through the walls.

Wired isn’t allowed to reveal what the headset will look like or how it will work beyond showing a small glass lens that’s used to project images into your eye. It’s also unclear when Magic Leap will be ready to launch. We just hope the company can live up to its own hype once it does hit the market.

Magic Leap Wired

Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...

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