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Samsung just made your brand new TV obsolete

by Todd Haselton | December 29, 2015

More than likely, Samsung will use CES next week to unveil a whole family of new and incredible smart TVs. They’ll probably have the brightest, most colorful and sharpest screens Samsung has ever introduced. But aside from all the added new hardware, Samsung is going to add at least one new feature that will make its TVs incredibly more powerful for users. You’re going to wish you held off on buying that new TV, because it’s already about to be obsolete.

Samsung recently confirmed that all of its 2016 SUHD TVs will be able to control more than 200 connected Internet-of-things (IoT) devices. Samsung said owners of the new TVs will be able to control the temperature of their homes, the lights, various connected appliances throughout the house, music, security cameras and so much more. Really, anything that’s sold by, or connected to, a SmartThings device should work, including ZigBee and Z-Wave devices, Samsung said.

Each TV will have a new “SmartThings” application that will launch a control panel for managing your local devices. It works with a free USB dadapter, dubbed the “SmartThings Extend” that will plug right into the back of your TV. Once that’s installed, you’ll get notifications about connected devices – maybe your washer cycle is done, for example, or maybe someone just activated your security camera – and you’ll be able to check in on them all without leaving your couch.

Samsung isn’t the only company that’s going to offer these sort of features. LG also confirmed that its new smart TV webOS 3.0 software will also enable similar support.

Samsung said it will discuss the technology further during CES, where we’ll be sure to dive deeper into how this all works.

Samsung

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Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...


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