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Kickstart this smartphone-powered hologram display

Earlier this month I spoke to the inventor of an actual hologram projector capable of creating 3D images all on its own. It’s a pretty awesome piece of technology, but it costs a whopping $700 to pre-order on Kickstarter. If that’s out of your price range don’t worry, there’s another Kickstarter project that can turn your current smartphone into a hologram display for just $25.

To be totally honest, the images created by this smartphone accessory aren’t officially holograms. Instead it’s a popular trick called Pepper’s Ghost, which works by creating a 4-sided picture that looks like a single 3D moving image when viewed. The same illusion was actually used to create the famous Tupac hologram back in 2012 at the Coachella music festival.

The Hologram Pyramid shrinks the entire illusion down to a pocket-sized plastic pyramid. It connects to your phone using a small suction cup so it won’t fall off, and it’s small enough to fit in your pocket.

The design supports most phones out there. Smith told me it should work just fine with the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus, along with Android phones ranging from the phablet-sized Galaxy S6 edge Plus to LG’s 5.5-inch G4 to the slightly smaller HTC One M9. The company’s also planning a larger pyramid meant for tablets.

Jim Smith, who created the pyramid, readily admits that he didn’t come up with the idea. He found the concept online, and decided he could improve the design and mass produce it himself. The suction cup was his own idea, and the plastic material was picked specifically to offer a higher quality image.

You can pre-order Hologram Pyramid for $25. It’s worth noting that are also cheaper pre-assembled versions of the pyramid available online, but none have that suction cup to hold it in place.

Smith notes that delays are possible, though at worst it should only be a few extra weeks of waiting. He has experience creating new products, and already has the manufacturers lined up. All he needs now is the money to fund mass production.

Kickstarter

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Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...


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