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$1 million Kickstarter campaign Project Phoenix hires a programmer after two years, delayed into 2018

by Ron Duwell | December 10, 2015December 10, 2015 6:30 pm PDT

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It’s been two years since Project Phoenix pulled in over $1 million to fund a JRPG on Kickstarter, one that could boast some of the best talent in the industry. Naturally, in all that time, we’ve seen a lot of brilliant screenshots and the glorious gameplay, and we are just mere weeks away from getting to enjoy this little bit of fantasy escapism, right?

Ummm, not so much. Project Phoenix is one of those nightmare Kickstarter campaigns which was already on limited life-support and is now teetering over the edge. Over the last two years, it has revealed nothing resembling a final game or even a game in progress, just the character models that it plans to use once it gets around to making it. Yeah, that’s the way it is. The development team at Creative Intelligence Arts doesn’t have any footage to show because actual development hasn’t started yet… after two years.

The drama came into public knowledge when the studio admitted that it hadn’t hired a programmer yet. The man that the team wanted to hire was busy, and when it came to be its turn in line, it got leap-frogged and the programmer didn’t sign on. Ever since, Creative Intelligence Arts has been searching for someone new, and it finally has a programmer on its payroll… who can’t start work on the project for a few more months.

However, it does have a programmer now, and the team now pegs the release window as 2018. Originally, it was estimated to launch in mid-2015, but delays are inevitable in Kickstarter, even ones that push it back five years after securing funding.

Naturally, backers are upset, but the team has not considered refunds as an option yet.

We know a lot of people are disappointed with the delays and organization of Project Phoenix. We are not considering refunds at this time. To initiate refunds is to give up on the project since there would be no money left to complete it. If we make the decision to call it quits then we will work out some kind of remediation with backers at that time. Until then we are pressing on.

I can’t remember why, but this is not a project that I backed. Looks like I dodged a bullet. Not so lucky with a few others, though.

Kickstarter Polygon

Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...

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