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MYNT to challenge Tile with a slimmer design, more features

by Jacob Kleinman | August 25, 2015August 25, 2015 10:00 am PDT

If you’re an absentminded techie who can’t go five minutes without losing your keys, wallet, or both, there’s a new gadget for you. MYNT, a super-thin and stylish tracker just hit Indiegogo hoping to raise $50,000. It’s a lot like Tile, but it’s smaller and packs a few extra features.

The main purpose of MYNT is to keep track of your keys, wallet or purse. Walk too far away from the tracker and your phone will let you know. It also works the other way, helping you find your phone by turning on a noisy alarm when you hold down the tracker’s single button.

You can also use MYNT to control the music on your phone, snap photos or control a power point presentation by clicking the device’s single button in a variety of ways. Using an app on your smartphone, you can assign a different function for a single press, two quick presses or three. Unfortunately that means you can only get access to three functions at any given time.

The app, which is available for Android and iOS, is easy to set up. The regular interface can feel a little complicated, though it’s possible that could improve before the device actually launches. MYNT also plans to offer an open SDK, so that third-party apps can be controlled as well.

MYNT is just 3.5mm thick and features a sleek anodized metal design. It looks great and feels extremely light. It definitely didn’t add any noticeable weight to my keychain.

You can choose between black or silver models for $15 (plus $4 for shipping). There’s also flashier gold and blue options starting at $20 with an early bird special. The device is ready for assembly, and should ship out right after the crowd-funding campaign is over.

The project is live now so you can head to Indiegogo to order one for yourself, or check out the video below for more information.


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Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...


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