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Devil’s Third isn’t terrible, you just suck at video games, says creator

Tomonobu Itagaki

Devil’s Third continues to be an underwhelming ripple in the video game world. North Americans haven’t had the chance to go hands-on with it, but the press in Europe certainly has with the game launching there next month. Turns out, those who even bothered with it didn’t have nice things to say. It seems as awful as we’ve all suspected.

However, the game’s creator, former Ninja Gaiden and Dead or Alive director Tomonobu Itagaki, has some choice words for those who slander his creation. The criticisms towards his game are not because it is terrible, but rather, it’s because the gamers who play it just aren’t very good at video games. He took the time to lash out on his Facebook page.

Guys,
At last, I was be able to understand about the reactions.
Devil’s Third is the game which reflects the player’s skill directly/vividly.
This is truth.

Yes, because those complaining about the jumpy frame rate, poor hit detection, and other antiquated design decisions are to blame, even though those things all fall on the developer to fix. No, you’re just a terrible player for not being able to control a broken video game.

Despite the complaints, I’m still willing to give Devil’s Third a chance. It reeks of an experience that is bound to plummet on the mainstream critic scales but survive in the hearts of a cult which follows it. Anybody ever played God Hand? Well, maybe not that good, but somewhere in the same vein as it.

Devil’s Third launches in Europe and Japan next month. Nintendo of America has yet to announce its own date, but something tells me it is not happy about Itagaki throwing the Wii U’s GamePad under a bus in defense of his own game. Nintendo can still rain that old-school 80s fire and brimstone from time to time.


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Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...


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