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Bloodstained becomes the biggest video game in Kickstarter history

Honestly, I didn’t think Castlevania still had the widespread allure to pull it off, but I’ve never been so happy to be proven wrong. Ex-Konami producer Koji Igarashi and his spiritual successor Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night have succeeded in becoming the biggest video game in Kickstarter history, knocking off the previous record holder, Torment: Tides of Numenera, which sat at $4,188,927.

As of writing, Bloodstained has just under one day to go in its campaign, and it sits at a comfortable $4,731,999. The final stretch goal has been revealed at $5 million, and it will guarantee that the game will feature a “roguelike” procedural generation mode, which sounds like just the most amazing thing. It’s a tall order to raise that much in 24 hours, but we’ve seen more dramatic events occur in the closing stretch of other Kickstarter campaigns.

Now, I’m not dissing Bloodstained in any way by saying this, but what is the massive appeal here? It’s an excellent looking game, but there are plenty of other “metroidvania” titles out there doing exactly the same things. What sets this apart? A big name developer? A connection to a popular franchise? Just the right coincidental timing to “stick it to man” at Konami. Not unlike how a donation towards Mighty No. 9 was a jab at Capcom?

Or did I just underestimate the gaming audience’s collective desire to play a new Nintendo DS style Castlevania game?

One thing that is certain: Koji Igarashi owes a whole lot of his success to a wonderfully run campaign by Fangamer and that healthy $28 minimum buy in. Those didn’t hurt its chances one bit.

Congratulations to all involved. Good luck on your final day, and I can’t wait to play your game. Bloodstained:Ritual of the Night will launch for the PC, Mac, Linux, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Wii U, and PS Vita, all thanks to stretch goals. Be sure to watch Koji Igarashi play the first off-screen footage.

Kickstarter

Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...

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