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Phil Schiller defends Apple’s most annoying hardware decisions

by Jacob Kleinman | June 10, 2015June 10, 2015 9:20 am PDT

Apple iPhone 6 Plus-4

Apple makes some great devices, but we don’t always agree with everything the company does. In a recent interview, Daring Fireball’s John Gruber got a chance to ask Apple’s Phil Schiller some tough questions, and Cupertino’s marketing chief did his best to answer them.

When asked why Apple still starts customers off with a 16GB iPhone, Schiller argued that it isn’t really an issue thanks to cloud storage. “The belief is more and more as we use iCloud services for documents and our photos and videos and music,” he said, “that perhaps the most price-conscious customers are able to live in an environment where they don’t need gobs of local storage because these services are lightening the load.”

Schiller adds that the money saved by cutting storage can also be used to improve the iPhone’s camera and other hardware. Still, 16GB of storage really isn’t enough as people take more photos and download more apps than ever before. By comparison, Samsung offers 32GB of storage with the cheapest version of the Galaxy S6, though it’s unclear if Apple will ever do the same.

Schiller also defended Apple’s decision to slim down the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, even though it meant an ugly camera bump and a smaller battery. He noted that the company carefully considers every device’s “thickness, every size, every weight,” testing multiple options before coming to the best possible decision.

Finally, Gruber asked why the new MacBook only offers a single USB-C port. Schiller responded that the company’s goal was to push the boundaries with its latest laptop, even if it made a few people uncomfortable. “If all we do is an incremental, slight change, where’s the excitement? We need to take risks.”

We’re not sure we agree with everything Schiller says, though Apple clearly puts a lot of thought into all these decisions. We’re still waiting for Daring Fireball to post the entire interview — it wasn’t live at the time of publication – but you can check the site via the source link below to see if it has been uploaded.


Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...

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