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Bloodborne beaten in 44 minutes, speed-runners continue to blow my mind

by Ron Duwell | March 31, 2015March 31, 2015 8:30 pm PDT

Because beating Dark Souls with a pair or Donkey Konga bongos or a Guitar Hero guitar is just not impressive enough anymore!

Speed-runners continue to be the most frightening group of people on the Internet with their uncanny ability to break video games wide open. YouTube user Oginam_tv has discovered a new way to skip large chunks of game time in From Software’s latest hit Bloodborne, allowing the game to be beaten in just under 44 minutes.

This is a time that he claims can also be improved upon once he finds a way to tie multiple boss glitches and exploitable paths together. Altogether, he charges through the game and a few bosses in 44 minutes total, skipping nearly a third of the game in the process and infuriating everybody with his impossible skills.

“This run makes use of a duplication glitch involving a second character’s stash inventory (that character is made during the run to show it) and a very early skip into a later part of the game (just jumping over a fence really). This was a pretty good run but I can certainly get faster.”

In the meantime, I must have spent 44 minutes just looking at loading screens in Bloodborne so far. I still think the 40-45 seconds it takes to come back after dying is a feature and not a glitch, because it allowed me enough time to clean up all the pieces of the breakfast plate I smashed. No need to improve those loading times, Sony.

Kotaku explains how to get the duplication glitch up and running.

Some will call his run illegitimate because of the exploits he uses, but that is the point of speed-running: finding the absolute fastest way to get from the starting point to the finish line, glitches and all. There are a wide variety of categories and styles for speed-running, be it glitch-free or those allowing exploits. On the speed-running scene, everything goes with the labels on it, and nobody should doubt the dedication and skill these players put into finding these paths.

Some might even say that digging up these glitches requires more dedication than beating the game outright.

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Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...

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