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Tri-Ace to continue developing console games after buyout

by Ron Duwell | March 10, 2015March 10, 2015 5:30 pm PDT

Resonance of Fate Dance

The JRPG world seemingly lost a fan-favorite player last month when Star Ocean developer Tri-Ace was bought out by mobile company Nepro Japan. Many assumed that the company was solely targeting the team’s Mobile & Game Studio to add to its own ranks of… well, mobile games, but a new press release from Nepro assures fans that Tri-Ace will still be developing games on consoles

The press release, translated by Siliconera, states that Nepro simply wants to be the very best at what it does given its relative size and access to talent. It looks to expand its portfolio of both mobile and console games, use its new acquisitions to found a creative environment, and be seen as a studio that can recruit and train talented developers. Most importantly, it wants to create a sense of trust and fun for both customers and publishers.

A graph provided by Nepro explains that it sees a lot of strength in Tri-Ace’s console roots, and it looks to ensure and build on that in the future. Whether that proves to be lip service or genuine interest on the console scene has yet to be seen.

Tri-Ace, as mentioned before, has always been something of an enigma in the gaming universe. Its theories and ideas peaked during the PSOne days, but every now and then it can make a popular cult-hit like Resonance of Fate. Most recently, it aided Square Enix in developing the Final Fantasy XIII sequels, showing competence for programming but not so much coming up with original ideas anymore.

Again, it might just be talk to wind down the situation, but only time will tell. Despite assurances, it didn’t take long for Columbus Nova to slash jobs from Sony Entertainment Online after it was bought out and rebranded as Daybreak Studios.

Are we seeing the final run of one of our JRPG mainstays if the same happens here?

Siliconera

Ron Duwell

Ron has been living it up in Japan for the last decade, and he has no intention of leaving this technical wonderland any time soon. When he's not...

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