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MoboRobo: A new way to manage your Android Phone from your PC

by Todd Haselton | February 11, 2015February 11, 2015 10:15 am PDT

When you connect your Android smartphone to your PC, often you’re simply greeted with a folder view to manage your files. It’s not an elegant way to access videos, music, photos and more. Thankfully, a company called MoboRobo has a solution with its Android PC manager software. It provides a simple user interface for accessing all of the aforementioned media, managing applications and so much more.

MoboRobo allows you to connect to your smartphone either wirelessly or using a USB connection. You’ll kick things off by installing the MoboMarket application, a third-party app you’ll need to download directly from the firm’s site. Then, once you’ve installed the corresponding software on your PC, you can either scan a QR code to start a wireless connection to your phone, or using a USB connection. We weren’t able to get the QR software working during our tests with a Windows PC, but the USB connection worked just fine.

After a few minutes, we were presented with a homescreen identifying our phone and the applications, music, images and videos installed on it. MoboRobo allows you to remotely install apps through its software, and you can also easily download and install wallpapers and device themes. A video section, where we presume short clips will soon be available for download, is currently under construction.

There’s an SMS management tool that allows you to view all of your text messages on your PC, which is great, but it’s limited. We received an error that Android 4.4 devices aren’t supported, so we were only able to view messages and not able to reply or delete them. There is a nice contact management system, however, so you can easily create new contacts from the text messages that you receive.

That also applies to the call logs section of the software, which provides a quick look at all calls, incoming calls, missed calls and outgoing calls, and offers the ability to save all of those numbers as new contacts in your address book. We weren’t able to place calls through the software, which could be a fun option that MoboRobo should consider adding to future versions of its software.

MoboRobo isn’t just about sync, however, though it does a fair job at that. You can also use the software to backup and restore your smartphone right to your PC, in case you’re more comfortable with a hard copy instead of a cloud-based one offered by Google and many device makers. Backup allows you to store a copy of contacts, your SMS logs, call logs, bookmarks, images and wallpapers right to your hard drive.

Another feature that’s useful is a built-in screenshot utility. It shows an image of your device and allows you to switch between portrait and landscape modes and even crop an image. You can’t interact with the device from this view, however, so you can’t open apps with your mouse, for example, but we like that screenshots are easily saved locally where you can copy them, delete them and more. There’s even a fullscreen presentation mode, which could be great for folks who are demoing a new application on a computer.

MoboRobo is also chock full of bonus content. Under apps, for example, you can search for apps that are recommended by MoboRobo and easily install them. There are also collections to browse through, like the “Best Apps of January” or the “Most Searched Apps,” which can give you a good idea of content to load up your new phone with. Under images, there’s a “Web resources” section that includes a “Wallpaper” center for browsing through different backgrounds you might want to download and install. Genres include beauty, stars, scenery, fashion, entertainment, creativity and “cute.” Or, if you prefer, you can choose an image from the gallery of photos stored on your phone and quickly apply it as your device wallpaper. If you want, there’s also a ringtone maker that allows you to select a song from your computer and then trim it down and apply it as your own ringtone. This is particularly useful for folks who already own an MP3 and don’t want to spend money on a special “ringtone” of a song they already own. Finally, a Themes area of the software lets you browse thousands of popular themes that include custom icons, widgets and wallpapers.

No, we’re not done discussing the features yet. We’re also big fans of the file manager, which allows you to dig into your phone’s folders right from inside MoboRobo, and a built-in device cleaner function. Device Cleaner automatically scans your phone and removes “residual files” that it believes are junk, to help improve the performance of your smartphone. You can also do this from the MoboMarket app on your phone, which has a Ram booster, a startup optimizer, an APK management system and more.

There are plenty of third party applications out there that allow you to manage texts, phone calls, content on your phone and more, but MoboRobo puts all of this together into an easy-to-use application that keeps everything in sync. And, better yet, everything can always be backed up to your computer so you’ll never lose all of the customization that you’ve applied to your phone.

This is where you might start to wonder how much MoboRobo is going to cost you, particularly with all of the useful options it includes. Thankfully, it’s all free – so you just need to download the app to your phone, install the PC client, and connect with a USB cable or via Wi-Fi. Then you’re all set – ready to install all the apps you desire, browse through unique wallpapers and more. So far as we can tell, you won’t ever spend a dime on the software, and there aren’t any hidden fees.

You can get started using MoboRobo right now by heading to the company’s website and installing the PC software. Let us know what you think about MoboRobo in the comments below, and what other features you’d like to the company add in the future.

This post and video were sponsored by MoboRobo.


Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...

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