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Future Macs Could Use Apple-Made Chips, Analyst Says

by Jacob Kleinman | January 14, 2015

apple chip predictions kuo jan 2015

Apple already designs the processors that power its iPhones, iPads and the upcoming Apple Watch, but the MacBook and Mac lineups still rely on Intel chips. That may change in the next few years though, at least according to a new report from popular Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI Securities.

In a recent report focused on Cupertino’s overall processor strategy, obtained by MacRumors, Kuo argues that the company could move away from its dependence on Intel in the next year or two. He adds that Apple would use the same basic chip-type found in its mobile devices, and could even use the same processors found in future iPads.

It seems unlikely an Apple chip will be used to power the rumored 12-inch MacBook Air, which is expected to launch early this year. But relying on its own processors could give the company even more control over future models. “Using self-developed AP can help Apple better control the timing of Mac launches and Mac product features,” Kuo adds.

The same report also offers a roadmap for Apple’s processor plans over the next few years. According to Kuo the Apple Watch’s S1 chip will be manufactured by Samsung, while a second-generation S2 is going to TSMC instead. Overall, it looks like Cupertino could switch back and forth between the two suppliers pretty regularly for the next few years when it comes to chips for future iPhones and iPads.

It’s worth noting that Kuo doesn’t have a perfect track record when it comes to predicting Apple’s strategy, but he’s still an interesting source for Cupertino news. If the company does ditch Intel for future MacBooks it could ripple through the entire industry, but for now it’s just another rumor.

MacRumors

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Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...