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Fitbit Adds New Windows Phone Features, Including Cortana Support

We might finally understand why Fitbit won’t support Apple Healthkit. Fitbit on Monday introduced three new products but, in a separate announcement, it also revealed several new features that are coming to its Windows Phone app and products that support Microsoft’s mobile operating system. Some new features include support for Cortana, push notifications, new challenges, support for additional languages and MobileTrack for users who don’t own Fitbit hardware.

One of the major features in the software update is beta support for Cortana, which will allow users to log meals with voice commands. “Fitbit, I ate lasagna for dinner,” is one example of a command that could work, and would allow the Fitbit software to generate a log. Voice commands for logging specific activities, like a bike ride, and a new exercise mode, will launch in December, the company said.

Meanwhile, Windows Phone will also support new fitness challenges, which will also roll out to Android and iOS. The app will recommend certain goals to chase down each day, week, or weekend, and users can compete with up to 10 other people for the best challenge score. The software also now supports background sync and push notifications, as well as French, German, Italian and Spanish.

Fitbit said the new features will work with its existing fitness products, including the Flex, One, Zip, and the Charge, which launched on Monday. The software will also support the Charge HR and Surge when those devices launch next year. Also, if you don’t own a Fitbit product, new MobileTrack support will allow you to use Microsoft’s Motion Data software on supported phones to keep track of your daily steps.

Most of those new features are available in a new Fitbit Windows Phone app that launches today, and new languages, support for mapping runs and a Windows 8.1 desktop app are also in the works.

Fitbit

Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...

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