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Samsung Has Insanely Fast Wi-Fi Tech Launching Next Year

by Todd Haselton | October 13, 2014October 13, 2014 12:30 pm PDT

Samsung Galaxy Alpha-3

Samsung recently announced that it has developed incredibly fast Wi-Fi technology that it will begin rolling out to new products next year. The tech, dubbed 802.11ad 60GHz, will allow devices to transfer data up to five times faster than existing technology, Samsung said, and the company plans to deploy it in everything from medical devices to smart home products and phones.

Wondering just how fast 802.11ad is?

Samsung said that current technology caps out at about 866Mbps or 108MB per second. Its hardware, however, will allow users to transfer files at 4.6Gbps, or 575MB per second. That means you could theoretically transfer a 1GB file from one device to another, maybe from your computer to your phone, in fewer than three seconds. Samsung said the technology can also be used to stream full HD videos from one device to another “in real-time without any delay.” Of course, to take advantage of the high-quality data transfer speeds, both devices will need to be outfitted with 802.11ad radio chips. So if you’re planning to stream HD video from your phone to your TV, you’ll need both a phone and a TV equipped with the new tech. Those may be tough to find, considering 802.11ac devices are still rolling out.

The 802.11ad protocol Wi-Fi was first introduced by the IEEE in 2009, but it appears Samsung has tweaked it enough to take advantage of some of its properties. Samsung said that 60GHz was tricky to work with since it typically needs line-of-site and can lose data transfer quality with anything blocking the signal, like walls, between two devices. It was able to work around those obstacles with a special wide-beam antenna, Samsung said.

The first devices with 802.11ad 60GHz technology developed by Samsung are expected to launch in early 2015.

Samsung

Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...

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