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Verizon Ditches Plans to Throttle Unlimited Users

by Todd Haselton | October 2, 2014October 2, 2014 10:00 am PDT

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Are you one of the remaining Verizon customers with an unlimited data plan? You might have noticed recently that the carrier issued a new policy in which it was going to start throttling the heaviest data users on its unlimited plans. Good news: that’s no longer going to happen.

Verizon’s original goal was partially to optimize its network in an effort to ensure fast throughput speeds for everyone else on the network as often as possible. The intent wasn’t to put a hard cap on data usage, but rather to throttle speeds when necessary to balance network traffic. It was met with criticism, however, both by the FCC and by unlimited subscribers who are grandfathered into those plans and have been with the carrier for years. Now Verizon is backing off of its throttling initiative, which, according to GigaOm, would have only applied to the top 5 percent of data-gobbling users.

“Verizon is committed to providing its customers with an unparalleled mobile network experience,” the carrier said recently. ” At a time of ever-increasing mobile broadband data usage, we not only take pride in the way we manage our network resources, but also take seriously our responsibility to deliver exceptional mobile service to every customer. We’ve greatly valued the ongoing dialogue over the past several months concerning network optimization and we’ve decided not to move forward with the planned implementation of network optimization for 4G LTE customers on unlimited plans.”

Verizon said it will instead work with “industry stakeholders” to manage traffic so that it can still promise fast speeds to both unlimited customers and those on its newer, bucket data plans. Speaking of those bucket plans, as of today customers can now call the carrier to have their buckets doubled in size at no additional cost.

GigaOm

Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...

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