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Kickstart This Wind-Powered Portable Charger

by Jacob Kleinman | September 28, 2014September 28, 2014 3:00 pm PDT

If you’re reading this article you probably love technology, but hopefully you love the environment as well. All those gadgets use up a lot of electricity, and unless you have solar panels on your roof or some other eco-friendly solution that means fossil fuels are probably being burned somewhere down the line to charge-up your tech. Now one company has a plan to power all your devices with wind power instead.

Flutter is a portable wind-powered turbine that can charge up to two devices on the go or at home. It features a sleek aluminum design with extra-coating for durability, and the entire thing is recyclable. It also packs two USB portsĀ (one 1A and a faster 2.1A), an LCD screen to show how much power you have left, LED lights and a built-in wireless speaker. There’s also a smaller and cheaper Flutter MINI, which weighs just two pounds and includes two 1A USB ports and LED lights.

Flutter isn’t cheap. The full-sized model will cost $350 when it hits the market, though you can grab it on Kickstarter for $299 with the early bird special. Meanwhile, the Flutter MINI is just $149. The company is also promising to donate one turbine to charity for each ten units it sells.

That high price is balanced out by some pretty impressive technology as well, which lets Flutter draw power from the wind even when there isn’t a strong breeze. Normal turbines need the wind to be moving at 9 mph or higher to work, while this model will start storing energy even if the wind is moving at just 5 mph. The design also uses magnetic bearings that make almost no noise at all, and Flutter can be re-configured to specific wind speeds depending on where you’re using it.

There are always some risks supporting any Kickstarter project and we’re not willing to rule out the possibility of delays or other issues down the line. Still, the company has plenty of time to ship early orders and already acknowledges that the design will probably need some last minute adjustments. Everything seems accounted for, though you still can’t rule out the possibility of some random event slowing down the process.


Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...

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