There are no active ads.

Advertisement

AT&T Cascade Sounds Amazing And Can’t Come Soon Enough

by Todd Haselton | August 19, 2014August 19, 2014 7:00 am PST

Samsung Gear Fit 12

Oh boy, the awesome folks at the AT&T Foundry are up to some cool stuff again. The same bunch of people that brought us the amazing connected luggage are working on a new initiative that should allow us to stay more connected than ever before. That means getting all of your wireless services everywhere.

Why is it, for example, that I can’t access my text messages on my tablet (save for iMessage or some third-party app)? AT&T’s employees asked the same question using “The Innovation Pipeline,” or TIP for short, which allows employees to suggest new ideas for the Foundry to work on. The Foundry has an answer to that very question, and it’s called Project Cascade.

“Project Cascade extends AT&T voice and messaging services linked to the user’s Primary Identity to be available on any secondary device,” the company explained recently. “As new classes of devices get connected to the AT&T network, Cascade will allow users to access their AT&T services seamlessly across their personal network of devices. At first, Cascade will allow users to send and receive calls and messages from any of your devices, including wearables and connected cars, without Bluetooth pairing. Of course, voice and messaging is only the first step towards making new and existing services available to any device seamlessly.”

That means that, with Cascade, you might be able to receive a text message on your watch simply because it’s connected to AT&T somehow, but not just because it’s receiving notifications from your smartphone. That has the potential to make wearables, tablets, connected in-car devices and everything else much more powerful than ever before. There’s no word on when this will launch, and sometimes AT&T’s Foundry projects don’t ever see the light of day, but we sure hope this one hits the street soon.

AT&T

Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement