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Major Tech Firms Urge Us All to Take Action To Protect Net Neutrality

by Jacob Kleinman | July 14, 2014July 14, 2014 4:00 pm PST

internet association members

It’s been over a month since the FCC offered up its new vision of Net Neutrality, including of a “fast lane” for companies with enough cash to pay for quicker service. Since then, the government agency has received hundreds of thousands of complaints and comments. With time running out to chime in, the Internet Association, which includes some of the biggest companies in tech, is issuing a statement of its own.

The Internet Association counts Amazon, Facebook, AOL, Google, Yahoo, Linked-In, Twitter, Reddit, Yelp, Zynga and more as its members. Pretty much every major Internet tech player is included, and not a single one is happy with the FCC’s ruling. In the group’s first official statement on Net Neutrality, it argues for an open and free Internet rather than the tiered version some ISPs are pushing for.

Specifically, the group calls for a clear and strong set of rules for net neutrality that apply to both wireless and wire-based Internet. That includes freedom from censorship and support for an open market. “Segregation of the Internet into fast lanes and slow lanes will distort the market, discourage innovation and harm Internet users,” the Internet Association notes.

Several additional tech companies and ISPs are expected to file their own comments tomorrow, though the FCC is close to closing the door on accepting input on its ruling. The public will be able to respond to the first round of comments through September 10, when the FCC finally makes an official decision.

You can check out a quick infographic from the Internet Association below. Hit the source links below to read the group’s full statement or to file your own comments.

net neutrality infographic


Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...

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