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Microsoft and Samsung Join WPC to Support Qi Charging

by Jacob Kleinman | March 13, 2014March 13, 2014 7:00 am PDT

wireless charging nexus

The Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) announced two new major supporters today, adding Microsoft and Samsung Electro-Mechanics to its board. The WPC is one of three groups pushing for wireless charging dominance with its own Qi standard, which is already supported by a number of flagship devices.

“Microsoft and Samsung Electro-Mechanics are important players in furthering Qi’s adoption in more devices, cars, products, and places,” said Vice President of Market Development at WPC John Perzow. “Qi leads the way in wireless charging with the fastest advances in inductive and resonance technology while ensuring compatibility with the entire 40+ million strong Qi ecosystem. That means that today and tomorrow, Qi products will continue to have the best features and will always work at any Qi charging spot, in the home, office, car and public locations.”

Microsoft’s decision to back the WPC makes sense considering its plans to take over Nokia’s phone business, which shipped many of its recent flagship smartphones with built-in Qi charging support. Meanwhile, Samsung has made an effort to back multiple competing standards and supports not only WPC but also the Alliance For Wireless Power (A4WP), which  has other major backers such as Qualcomm, Broadcom, Dell, Intel, LG, Sony and other big-name tech players.

WPC already has wireless partners around the globe including Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile, China Mobile, NTT DoCoMo, O2 and Telefonica as well as many leading device-makers. The Qi standard also boasts a head start in vehicle integration, though it faces tough competition from both the A4WP and the Power Matters Alliance, which recently announced their intention to join forces and team up against the WPC.

WPC

Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...

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