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Google Takes Its Street View Technology to the Galapagos Islands

by Brandon Russell | September 12, 2013September 12, 2013 9:00 pm PST

Having covered nearly every corner of the globe with its Street View tech, Google has turned its searching eyes toward the volcanic archipelago of the Galapagos Islands. Considered one of the most biodiverse places on the planet, the Galapagos is famous for being an example Charles Darwin used to form his theory of evolution. With so many other beautiful destinations to visit, chances are you won’t ever make it to the small chain of islands. But you don’t have to thank just Google.

To commemorate the 178th anniversary of Darwin’s discovery of the Galapagos Islands, Google partnered with Galapagos National Park and the Charles Darwin Foundation to bring beautiful 360-degree imagery right to the Internet. By using its Street View Trekker backpacks, the group was able to explore and capture the incredibly diverse Galapagos geography, and see what Darwin saw back in 1835. Now you’ll be able to see the same views all from the comfort of your own home. Google’s Street View is a feature we expect to see in big cities, but seeing projects like this highlights how incredibly valuable the tech can be.

In addition to exploring the islands, Google’s team also partnered with the Catlin Seaview Survey and used an SVII underwater camera to snap images of the marine life. In one collection of images, Google’s Street View shows an especially playful group of Sea Lions. Exploring places digitally is never like actually being there, but not everyone has the means to travel. And, hey, you can visit Street View locations anytime you like, day or night, so it is certainly an adequate substitution.


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Brandon Russell

Brandon Russell likes to rollerblade while listening to ACDC.

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