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55 Percent of Smartphone Users Plan to Trade-In for Next Upgrade

by Todd Haselton | August 5, 2013August 5, 2013 8:25 am PST

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Smartphone consumers are more attracted to trade-in options than ever before, according to a new report from NPD. The research company found that, of all smartphone consumers, 60 percent know of available options that allow them to trade-in their current device toward the purchase of an upgrade. Of that 60 percent, 55 percent are interested in using a trade-in plan for their next upgrade.

Trade-in options are available from most carriers, most of which offer a credit toward the purchase of a new smartphone with the trade-in of an old device. Additionally, eBay and other online or brick and mortar destinations also allow you to recycle old devices for a quick cash buyout. “Trade-ins, in their many variations, are the new competitive battlefield for carriers, retailers and OEMs,” explained Eddie Hold, NPD’s vice president of Connected Intelligence. “Consumers are embracing these smartphone trade-in options and open to alternative models in return for a better trade-in value. This means that the consumer may not necessarily shop at the carrier store for their next device, but instead may look to big box retailers if the trade-in price is right.”

T-Mobile, Verizon Wireless and AT&T also recently introduced new frequent upgrade programs, though customers are required to turn-in their old device when they purchase a new device – completely removing any chance of a resell.

NPD said that just 13 percent of smartphone owners confirmed that they have ever traded in a device (yours truly is among them), but 30 percent of consumers would switch their wireless carrier for one that offers a better price on a smartphone trade-in. We generally like these deals, but recommend that you explore all of your options and take the best offer for your device.

NPD

Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...

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