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iOS Developers Still Make More Than Android Devs

Android may boast a bigger market share than iOS, but when it comes to competing app stores Apple still reigns supreme, with developers making more money on average and plenty of apps landing on the iPhone long before they’re ported to Android handsets. That may change soon though, maybe even by the end of the year.

According to a report from VisionMobile’s survey, Android may finally close the revenue gap for developers, which could in turn bring more original content to Google’s mobile platform. In a study involving 6,000 mobile developers, the research organisation broke down app revenue and variety among all the major platforms, including not just Android and iOS but also Windows Phone, BlackBerry 10 and HTML5.

iOS still leads when it comes to pure revenue, though just barely. The average mobile developer makes $5,200 with Apple and just $500 less ($4,700) on Android. Meanwhile, Windows Phone developers are making $3,600, likely thanks to Microsoft’s generous policy to encourage app growth in its ecosystem. Rounding out the top five are HMTL5 at $2,900 and BlackBerry 10 at $1,200.

VisionMobile also breaks down revenue models choices across the same five platforms, revealing how developers prefer different pay styles on different operating systems. On Android, the most popular revenue model is in-app advertising (30 percent), while iOS users appear more willing to pay directly for their apps either before downloading or through in-app purchases.

The survey also covers “mindshare” (the percentage of developers using each platform) and “intentshare” (developers planing to adopt a platform). Out of 5,271 app developers, 72 percent are working on Android while 56 percent work on iOS, implying that there are plenty of people who split their time between multiple platforms. It also looks like almost 50 percent of developers were planning on adopting Windows Phone in Q1 2013, suggesting that Microsoft’s mobile ecosystem may get the boost it needs in the near future, although that percentage dropped to 35 in Q3.


Jacob Kleinman

Jacob Kleinman has been working as a journalist online and in print since he arrived at Wesleyan University in 2007. After graduating, he took a...

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