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Google CEO Larry Page Explains Voice Problems

by Todd Haselton | May 14, 2013

larry-page

Google CEO Larry Page has sounded raspy for the past few years or so, mostly when he has to speak during the company’s earnings calls. His health has been of some concern to the media and industry analysts alike, but now Page has spoken up about what’s going on.

Page said it all started about 14 years ago when he was down with a bad cold, which ultimately left him without a voice. He didn’t really worry about it—that’s pretty common when you have a cold—so he let it be. As it turns out, Page says he never fully recovered from the lost voice during that cold.

A doctor eventually said he had vocal cord paralysis in which nerves don’t function as they should. Still, doctors weren’t able to pinpoint how or why it ever happened. Then Page got another cold last summer.


“Once again things didn’t fully improve, so I went in for a check-up and was told that my second vocal cord now had limited movement as well,” Page explained, noting that the doctors couldn’t figure out why it happened again. He said he’s still able to work and is fully functional but that is voice is “softer than before.”

“But overall over the last year there has been some improvement with people telling me they think I sound better.  Vocal cord nerve issues can also affect your breathing, so my ability to exercise at peak aerobic capacity is somewhat reduced,” he said, noting that he still has enough energy to go kitesurfing and do other intensive activities. 

Page hopes that others with voice issues will help out continuing research in the field by interacting with voicehealth.org/ip.

Larry Page Google+ Reuters

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Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...


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