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10 Weeks On, PS Vita is Nowhere Near as Successful as its Predecessor in U.K.

PS Vita In Hand

The PS Vita has been on sale in the United States and Europe for ten weeks now, and despite its terrific features, the handheld has been nowhere near as successful as its predecessor when it comes to the U.K. market. In fact, with just 110,000 consoles sold, the device hasn’t even reached a third of the figures achieved by the PSP in its first ten weeks on sale.

According to Dorian Bloch, business group director with research company Chart-Track, the PSP managed to sell 3.5 times as many units as the PS Vita after ten weeks on sale in the U.K. But he notes that there are two good reasons for that.

First, the PSP was launched during the build-up to the fourth quarter, which includes Christmas and is one of the busiest periods for retail. Whereas the PS Vita was launched “at a traditionally quiet time.” Second, there’s a substantial difference in launch prices for the two devices, with the PS Vita marked at around £232 (approx. $372), and the PSP at £178 (approx. $286).

The PS Vita also had big shoes to step into. The PSP holds the record for the U.K.’s fastest-selling console during its first week, as well as the record for the number of weeks taken to achieve one million sales (24). If the PS Vita continues to sell at its current rate, it will take Sony’s latest handheld until late next year to achieve the one million milestone.

However, key titles are expected to boost PS Vita sales before year’s end. First up is Resistance: Burning Skies, which makes its debut at the end of May. And that will be followed by the likes of Gravity Rush in June, and LittleBigPlanet, Killzone, Call of Duty and more over the next few months.

Have you adopted the PS Vita yet? If not, why not?

[via PocketGamer]


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Killian Bell

Killian Bell is a 20-something technology journalist based in a tiny town in England. He has an obsession with that little company in Cupertino...Killian Bell is a 20-something technology journalist based in a tiny town in England. He has an obsession with that little company in Cupertino...


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