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Apple and Samsung Ordered to Further Trim Claims in Court Case

by Sean P. Aune | May 3, 2012May 3, 2012 2:15 pm PDT

Apple vs Samsung Courtroom

A judge has ordered Apple and Samsung to trim the number of claims leveled at one another in a court case before the trial begins on July 30.

Judge Lucy Koh is not cutting Apple and Samsung a whole lot of slack in the lead up to the trial the two companies will be having before her and a jury this summer. Already she has ordered the CEOs of both companies to sit down this month for negotiations, but she isn’t ignoring the potential for this to still come before her.

According to Computerworld, the lawyers for both parties had a pre-trial conference with the judge on Wednesday were they presented the results of the first round of trying to pare down the number of claims against one another.  The result was that there were 16 patents, six trademarks, five “trade dress” claims, an antitrust case and 37 products accused of violations left in play.  Each company will have 25 hours to present its case to the jury, and Judge Koh said of the results, “I think that’s cruel and unusual punishment to a jury, so I’m not willing to do it.  If you’re going to trial in July, this is not going to be acceptable.”

Both companies representatives blamed the other for a lack of cooperation in the streamlining, but Judge Koh has told them to go through it again or else she would be force to push the trial back to 2013.

Harold McElhinny of Morrison & Foerster is representing Apple, and he had the most to say about his hopes to hold to the current trial date.  He asked Judge Koh for some guidance on how much more she would like to see the claims reduced, but she would not offer an answer.

Of an amusing note, the lawyers from both sides also made some requests ahead of the hearing, including Apple requesting that the Samsung logo on in-court video screens be obscured during the actual trial before the jury.  While a minor thing, it makes some sense as it could subconsciously influence the jury, but if you’ve ever wondered why trials move so slow, there’s one possible answer for you.

 

[via Computerworld]


Sean P. Aune

Sean P. Aune has been a professional technology blogger since July 2007, but his love of tech dates back to at least 1976 when his parents bought...

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