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Canon EOS 60Da: The Perfect Camera for Astronography

by Nico Mojica | April 5, 2012

Canon 60DaIt is extremely refreshing when a company releases a new product without it being leaked or rumored prior to its announcement. On April 3, 2012, Canon unveiled something that no one expected. The company introduced the Canon EOS 60Da, the perfect camera for astronography. The “a” at the end of the name signifies that it is the astronography version of the camera. The last time Canon had a modified version of a camera built for astronomers was in 2004, when they announced the Canon 20Da, a modified Canon 20D.

The Canon EOS 60Da will cost $1499, and is essentially a Canon 60D with a few teaks. It shares the same 18-megapixel sensor and 100-12,800 ISO range with the 60D. The differences are that the 60Da has a modified infrared filter with an increased amount of hydrogen-alpha light transparency. This will allow the camera to better capture the reddish tint of the atmosphere. The camera also has a different infrared light blocking filter than the standard DSLR. The IR blocker on the Canon 60Da allows the camera to capture a larger amount of the true colors that you would see in the sky.

Canon 60Da vs 60D Image Comparison

These different features on the 60Da will be useful to some, but are not really “upgrades” for the regular shooter. They are changes to satisfy a specific niche: Astronography. Unless you are an astronomer, or really like taking pictures of planets and stars, do not feel bad if you just bought a Canon 60D. The 60Da is probably not for you anyway.

I am not an astronomer, but even I am excited by this camera! What do you think about the Canon EOS 60Da?

[Via: Adorama]


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Nico Mojica

Nico Mojica is a Graphic Design student at the Savannah College of Art and Design, but his true passion lies within Photography. Ever since his high...Nico Mojica is a Graphic Design student at the Savannah College of Art and Design, but his true passion lies within Photography. Ever since his high...


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