There are no active ads.

Advertisement

Top 5 Features of the HTC One X

by Todd Haselton | April 2, 2012April 2, 2012 9:30 am PDT

HTC One X - Top 5 Features

We just reviewed the HTC’s brand new flagship device, the One X (video review here). There’s so much to talk about with this phone, however, so we figured it’d be helpful for our readers to see a quick top 5 rundown of our favorite features. Let’s get started:

1. Incredible Industrial Design

The HTC One X is chock full of amazing features: it’s built of a super sturdy and scratch-resistant polycarbonate plastic, which means you don’t get too many finger prints on the body and don’t have to worry about it looking like it’s been kicked around on the pavement after spending some time next to the keys in your pocket. It’s also amazingly thin (just 8.9mm thick) and offers a soft-touch back that adds to premium look and feel. Then, of course, there’s the insanely crisp 4.7-inch display with a 1280 x 720-pixel resolution (yes, that’s an HD screen). It’s bright even under direct sunlight. Also, text and games look sharper than we’ve seen on most high-end phones.

2. Excellent 8-megapixel Camera

HTC packed its own ImageSense engine for processing photos in the One X. It allows users to shoot at incredible speeds (0.7 second intervals), which means you can actually just hold down the shutter button to take a continuous stream of photos in rapid fire. It’s great for capturing fast-moving objects or just snapping multiple photos at once to ensure that you’ve captured the perfect shot. Better yet, the camera only takes 0.2 seconds to auto-focus. We found our 8-megapixel images were excellent, although on a par with what we’ve seen from other high-end smartphone shooters. Still, HTC sweetens the deal by adding a host of image filters that can automatically be applied to any image almost instantaneously.

3. NVIDIA Tegra 3 Quad-Core Processor

The One X’s NVIDIA Tegra 3 quad-core processor is the fastest processor we’ve ever tested on a smartphone. Its Quadrant benchmark speeds doubled that of the Galaxy Nexus and were about 4x faster than the Nexus S. Every single app opened and closed almost instantaneously. Plus, there’s a dedicated graphics engine with 12-cores that totally blew our minds in several games specifically designed for the chip. The titles, such as Riptide and ShadowGun THD, offered more visual effects than they do on NVIDIA’s Tegra 2 chip or on any other smartphone. Riptide, for example, offered an enhanced effect that showed water splashes on the screen after we took a big jump on a jetski and landed hard on the water.

4. HTC Sense 4.0

HTC Sense 4.0 offers the best custom Sense user interface yet. HTC mainly focused on the aforementioned ImageSense camera engine and the added storage, which I’ll discuss later. But the UI also felt less intrusive and faster than any previous version of Sense. We loved the ability to customize the lock screen to our liking. The weather lock screen was a favorite, but there are other small tweaks, such as the ability to launch the camera even while the phone is locked with a password. Also, Beats Audio enhances all of the audio on a device — from Spotify to your games — instead of just the MP3s that are played back inside HTC’s music application.

5. Tons of storage – including 25GB of free cloud storage

The One X comes with 32GB of storage, which is plenty for photos, music and videos. But HTC stepped it up even more by partnering with DropBox for an additional 25GB of cloud storage for two years. The integration is seamless, and it means that you’re basically able to store 57GB on the One X. That’s more than we’ll ever need, we think, and it’s a solid alternative considering that the phone doesn’t have a removable microSD storage slot.

The One X blew our minds in terms of performance and design. We absolutely can’t wait for HTC’s U.S. models to hit store shelves in the coming months. Be sure to read our full review and check out our full video review on our YouTube channel.


Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement