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Apple Offers Competitors Royalty-Free License for Nano-SIM technology; Nokia Bites Back

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Apple recently proposed that all phone manufacturers move over to a new “nano-SIM” technology that’s currently smaller than the microSIM cards used in the iPhone 4S, Nokia Lumia devices and other popular phones. According to the Financial Times, however, Nokia, Research In Motion and Motorola, however, fought back against Apple’s plans, even though the iPhone maker has backing from several of Europe’s largest wireless carriers. It turns out, though, that Motorola, RIM, Nokia might not need to worry that Apple is only introducing the standard to make a quick buck.

Patent expert Florian Mueller from FOSSPatents recently said that he saw a letter in which Apple proposed that it will grant royalty free licenses to its competitors. Mueller explained specifically that the Cupertino-based firm has offered to issue “royalty-free licenses to any Apple patents essential to nano-SIM, provided that Apple’s proposal is adopted as a standard and that all other patent holders accept the same terms in accordance with the principle of reciprocity.” As Mueller also points out, Apple doesn’t typically allow competitors to license its technology for free — after all, Apple is battling Motorola, Samsung, HTC and other firms in courts around the globe — but it certainly shows Apple is committed to the technology.

Nokia still doesn’t like Apple’s proposition, however. “Apple’s proposal for royalty-free licensing seems no more than an attempt to devalue the intellectual property of others,” the company said in a statement on Monday.

We’re just curious as to why the tech is needed at all. MicroSIM cards are already small enough and easily lost when removed from a phone. And it’s not like SIM cards need to get any thinner. Or do they?


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Todd Haselton

Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...Todd Haselton has been writing professionally since 2006 during his undergraduate days at Lehigh University. He started out as an intern with...


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