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iPad Apps More Than Double in Size With Retina Display Artwork

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Having been spoiled with a Retina display on the iPhone 4 and the latest iPod touch, I don’t think I know of one iPad owner who wasn’t crying out for a high-resolution display for Apple’s third-generation tablet. Now we have one, but the problem is, it comes at a price.

You see, high-resolution artwork, designed for a 2048×1536 display, is significantly larger in terms of file size than artwork designed for the iPad 2’s 1024×768 display. That’s bad news for your storage space.

Cult of Mac’s Charlie Sorrel reports that Apple’s own iPad applications, which have already been updated to include Retina display artwork, have more than doubled in size. Keynote increases from 115MB to 227MB; Numbers from 109MB to 283MB; and Pages from 95MB to 296MB. iMovie increases from just 70MB to a whopping 404MB.

Of course, some of these applications also came with minor improvements, which will account for some of that space. But most of it has undoubtedly been spent on artwork.

You may not notice the increase initially, but as developers continue to update their applications to accommodate the display, you’re going to find that your iPad’s storage space is being eaten up very quickly. This could prove to be a huge frustration if you’ve only got a 16GB iPad.

And it doesn’t just apply to those with the new iPad. Although you can’t enjoy that high-resolution artwork on the original iPad or the iPad 2, it’s still included within each app, and it continues to take up the same amount of storage space.

I’m sure that when we have the new iPad in our hands and we’re staring at all of its 3.1 million pixels, this will seem like a small sacrifice. But it’s certainly something worth considering when you’re deciding how much storage space you want on your new device.

What do you think of these size increases with Retina-ready iPad apps?

[via Cult of Mac]


Killian Bell

Killian Bell is a 20-something technology journalist based in a tiny town in England. He has an obsession with that little company in Cupertino...

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