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33% of Divorces In U.K. Are Blamed On Facebook

by Killian Bell | December 30, 2011December 30, 2011 5:00 am PST

unhappy couple

Social networks like Facebook make it easier than ever to get in touch with old friends, school classmates, and even the ones who got away. For some, the temptation to reach out to their old flame and rekindle a lost relationship is too much — and they don’t let a silly little thing like marriage get in the way.

Even so, I was still surprised to discover this morning that a whopping 33% of divorces in the U.K. are blamed on Facebook. Of the 5,000 people surveyed by the website Divorce-Online this year, over a third said that Facebook was the main reason for the breakdown of their marriage, with spouses using the site to get up to no good. Furthermore, the report claims that Facebook is often used to make inappropriate public comments about a former spouse after separation.

The top three reasons for blaming Facebook, according to the report, are: “Inappropriate messages to members of the opposite sex,” “separated spouses posting comments about each other,” and “Facebook friends reporting a spouse’s behavior.”

What’s more, a spokesman for the Divorce-Online website, Mark Keenan, says that Facebook comments and posts are increasingly being used in courtroom battles between married couples, especially for disputes involving children and finances:

“People need to be careful what they put on Facebook as the courts are now seeing a lot more evidence being introduced from people’s walls and posts in disputes over finances and children.”

Twitter isn’t quite so damaging to a relationship, according to the report, with just 0.4% of breakups blamed on the micro blogging site.

While it’s easy to see how Facebook can come between a married couple, I’m surprised that over a third of divorces in the U.K. are blamed on the social network. How do you feel about that, Zuckerberg?

[via Pocket-lint]


Killian Bell

Killian Bell is a 20-something technology journalist based in a tiny town in England. He has an obsession with that little company in Cupertino...

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