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Hidden Gems: Killer7

by Joey Davidson | December 22, 2011December 22, 2011 11:30 pm PDT

In this weekly column, we’ll be selecting inexpensive, discarded titles from still playable consoles for your perusal. They may be games you’ve heard of and remember playing, or they may be games that have flown completely off of your radar. Just know that we love them and they’re available on the cheap. That’s a bonafide win/win situation.

If you have any favorite titles that you consider hidden gems, let us know in the comments below and we might feature your pick in the weekly column.

Killer7
Platform: PlayStation 2, GameCube
Original Release: July, 2005

Odds are, you’ve probably only heard of Goichi Suda and Grasshopper Manufacture for one series of games: No More Heroes. Well, before Travis Touchdown got to slaughtering assassins, Suda lead the charge on a completely unique game called Killer7.

The title launched for the PlayStation 2 and GameCube in the summer of 2005. Back then, it was bizarre. Heck, even by today’s standards it would be a creepy, unique title. Players fill the shoes of seven assassins as they work through a plot centered around American born conspiracy.

What’s crazy about the title is the art style, the gameplay design and the themes at work. The art style is this almost cel shaded high contrast look at colorful noir. The gameplay keeps players on rails as they explore each level both forwards and backwards. When you find an enemy, you’re greeted by a weird laugh and the need to switch to a first person perspective in order to put it down.

Killer7 certainly isn’t a title for everyone. It is, however, an innovative and creative move in the world of gaming. If you consider yourself among the core fans of the medium, this title should be experienced at least once.

Be sure to check out our ever-growing list of Hidden Gems.

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Joey Davidson

Joey Davidson leads the gaming department here on TechnoBuffalo. He's been covering games online for more than 10 years, and he's a lover of all...

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