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Luigi’s Mansion 2: Ghostbusting in 3D (Video)

by Jack McGrath | June 8, 2011June 8, 2011 12:21 pm PDT

At Nintendo’s E3 press briefing, many attendees welcomed the announcement of Luigi’s Mansion 2, a sequel to the 2001 GameCube game, as part of Nintendo’s second wave of first-party 3DS titles. Though the company only gave us a short look at the title, it did not disappoint. At a glance, this is the same good-looking game with fun and unique gameplay mechanics. The only apparent difference is that moderately spooky visuals will jump out at you with the addition of stereoscopic 3D.

In Luigi’s Mansion 2, Professor E. Gadd returns to ghost research, once more employing the taller Mario brother to investigate haunted houses. The depth-of-field is different, but the core ghostbusting process is the same: Luigi hunts from room to room in search of a particular boss, all the while plagued by smaller, equally bothersome ghosts. Enemies must be incapacitated by a strobe of your trusty flashlight before you give them the Hoover treatment, always maintaining a steady pull against the direction said ghosts are attempting to flee.

Unfortunately, it’s difficult to find all of Luigi’s Mansion 2‘s nostalgia-inducing elements endearing when they’re surrounded by some of the worst framerate issues that became particularly evident when Nintendo representatives began showing the game to attendees. They were certainly exacerbated by Luigi’s method of movement. Usually, he moves about methodically, but in some of the game’s more frantic moments when Luigi is forced to run out of fear, the framerate slows to a crawl.

With a launch window of early 2012, Next Level Games has plenty of time to try and remedy the slowdown. Until then, be sure to check back here for the latest news on Luigi’s Mansion 2.

What do you, fellow gamers, think? Are you looking forward to stepping into the shoes of Mario’s brother to hunt down eerie creatures of the night once again? Sound off in the comments below.


Jack McGrath

Rooted in his childhood obsession with dismantling and reassembling gizmos and gadgets around the house, Jack McGrath's knowledge of programming,...

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