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Kotick Talks Guitar Hero And Subscription Based Call of Duty

by Joey Davidson | February 11, 2011February 11, 2011 3:30 pm PDT

Bobby Kotick and Guitar HeroIn a brief interview with CNBC, Activision’s CEO, and often ill-portrayed face of gaming executives, was hit with a line of questions regarding the company’s recent Guitar Hero cancellation and the future success of Call of Duty.

The analysts and anchors challenging Kotick were quick to point towards a connection between violent games and fiscal success. They specifically latched onto the notion that Call of Duty is successful because of its violent basis, and that Activision tried to do the same with the most recent Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock by including “warriors” in the title. The look on Kotick’s face at the time of this question said it all.

Kotick dismissed the false connection between financial success and violent baselines by quickly stating that many fiscally viable products appeal to all ages. He indicated that Guitar Hero has been dismissed simply because it’s become evident that consumers aren’t excited by music games anymore. While that may be true, Activision is partially to blame because they gave consumers nothing to be excited about. Their music genre visitations have been rehashings of the same gaming experience for the last several years.

Kotick was also asked if the company was considering a subscription based plan for Call of Duty. This is the part where any gamers watching probably shuttered, expecting the worst. Kotick actually made good, however.

The company is focusing on making the games fun and exciting. A subscription model is not in the works.

What we really spend time thinking about is how do you create new and compelling Call of Duty experiences that are going to delight the audiences, and usually people are willing to pay for the content if you deliver them something spectacular. Which is our intention.

Bobby Kotick, deservedly or not, catches a lot of internet hate when it comes to the gaming community. His quotables, his industry behavior and his involvement with Activision during a time of rampant success have all contributed to this common feeling of dislike among gamers.

Is Kotick just running a company to the best of his abilities, or are the meteors of nerd rage constantly flung at him warranted?

[via VG247]


Joey Davidson

Joey Davidson leads the gaming department here on TechnoBuffalo. He's been covering games online for more than 10 years, and he's a lover of all...

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