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Motorola XOOM Super Bowl Ad Takes A Big Swipe At Apple

The Motorola XOOM Super Bowl ad aired during the big game, and while not exactly what we saw recently, the company still took a swipe at Apple’s old “1984” ad.

While Apple took a swipe at IBM back in its “1984” ad (that actually aired on Dec. 31st, 1983), Motorola is trying to draw a similar parallel that we are all drones in the Apple-controlled world. However, there’s a small problem with this as IBM did nearly control 100 percent of the computing market back then, and now Apple did control about 95 percent of the tablet market … because it was about the only game in town.

As we recently reported, with the release of numerous Android tablets, iPad market share has dropped to 75 percent, and analysts are expecting it to drop down into the 50 percent range as even more competitors come out into the marketplace. This is a far cry from the analogy Apple drew of IBM back in the day.

True, this ad never once mentions Apple, and that actually may be a problem for the advertisement. Luckily it shows off the features of the XOOM, but are the majority of people watching the commercial going to have any clue what the majority of it is about? What about that quick flash of the guy reading 1984?  What’s with all of the white clothes?  Why does everyone appear to be a drone?  The only thing that kind of gives it away is the removal of the ear buds at the end, but even that is a bit hard to catch.

Was it worth $6 million?  ($3 million per 30 second ad, this ran for 60 seconds)  Will it get people asking about the XOOM?  Who knows, but it was a bold gamble, and now we’ll just have to see if it pays off for Motorola.

What say you?  What did you think of the ad?


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Sean P. Aune

Sean P. Aune has been a professional technology blogger since July 2007, but his love of tech dates back to at least 1976 when his parents bought...Sean P. Aune has been a professional technology blogger since July 2007, but his love of tech dates back to at least 1976 when his parents bought...


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